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IonicWind Snippit Manager 2.xx Released!  Install it on a memory stick and take it with you!  With or without IWBasic!


Ionic Wind Linux Project

Started by Ionic Wind Support Team, January 23, 2007, 09:45:55 PM

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Rock Ridge Farm (Larry)

Works for me.
I can execute it from a console window but it does not work as an icon on the desktop - strange.

Ionic Wind Support Team

The gnome desktop uses launchers, kind of like Windows shortcut icons.  Right click on the desktop and choose "create launcher" pick a name for it, browse to the executable, and pick an icon.

Or you can use nautilus, and just double click on an exectuable directly.  I did notice that if you remove the .zip extension from nautilus and then try immediatly double clicking it doesn't work.  Clicking on the "reload" icon solved that.

Paul.
Ionic Wind Support Team

Rock Ridge Farm (Larry)

I got it to work by selecting open with another application and using 'sh' as the launcher.

Doc

Finally got home from work so I could try it out... works great on this end as well.

I dropped it on the desktop, renamed it and set the permissions and it launches with a double-click just as expected.

Cool beans!

-Doc-

Ionic Wind Support Team

And the next test program is ready.  Rename to remove the .zip extension, chmod to make it executable, and run by either double clicking in nautilus or using ./christmas_tree from a terminal

This is Larry A's christmas tree generator that has been adapted so many times ;).  We are to the point now that programs like this almost compile without any changes at all.  The font subsytem is not yet complete so the text on the greeting is just a default font, that will change soon ;)

Post a screen shot of it so we can compare.

Paul.
Ionic Wind Support Team

Rock Ridge Farm (Larry)

Works here - looks just like the Windows one.

LarryA

So... I guess I can say I've written a Linux program.  ;)

Did you ever add a timing delay to that? Half the fun, in IBasic Standard (and a slower computer) was watching the random branches and needles grow... last time I ran it in IBasic Pro on current computer, it just appeared as a finished picture immediately  :( .  I guess that demonstrates how fast the language is though.
"Aerodynamics are for people who can't build engines." -- Enzo Ferrari
"Turbochargers were for people who can't build engines" -- Keith Duckworth

Doc

Again, it works just fine here!

QuotePost a screen shot of it so we can compare.

Alrighty then...

-Doc-

Ionic Wind Support Team

Thanks Doc.  Since you're using a different theme than I am it shows that I am getting drawing sizes correct ;)
Ionic Wind Support Team

Parker

I just tested the programs, they're really impressive. I think a lot of people will like being able to write code once and compile it on multiple platforms. Kinda like C++ except without the frustration, external dependencies, compiler incompatibilities, etc ;). Hopefully two stable cross platform compilers will bring many more buyers.

mrainey

Hey Linux weenies,

I thought I might as well play a little, so downloaded the CD Installer for Ubuntu 6.10.  I burned the ISO and started the boot process - got past the opening Run or Install screen okay, but a minute or two later the process got stuck on an endless series of "Buffer I/O Error on device hdc, logical block xx"" (each line showed a different logical block number).

My XP installation runs fine.

What might the error mean?
Software For Metalworking
http://closetolerancesoftware.com

Doc

February 08, 2007, 08:11:16 PM #111 Last Edit: February 08, 2007, 08:19:21 PM by David Coker
Gee Mike,
I wish I could be of help, but I've never encountered anything like like...

Did you by chance do a checksum test on the download to verify that it was good? Over the years I've ended up with my share of bad ISO files, which can create all kinds of havoc.

-Doc-

Edit: Added link to a free MD5 tool for Windows.

http://www.nullriver.com/index/products/winmd5sum

Ionic Wind Support Team

hdc is your CDROM drive.  Burn the ISO at a slower speed and try again.  I have had bad burns do that before and setting the write speed to 8x solved it.  It could also be a corrupted download.

Paul.
Ionic Wind Support Team

mrainey

I'll try the slower burn speed first.  If that doesn't help, I'll try a combination of new download, checksum validation, and slower burn speed.

Thanks.
Software For Metalworking
http://closetolerancesoftware.com

Kale

Quote from: mrainey on February 08, 2007, 07:57:42 PM
Hey Linux weenies,

I thought I might as well play a little, so downloaded the CD Installer for Ubuntu 6.10.  I burned the ISO and started the boot process - got past the opening Run or Install screen okay, but a minute or two later the process got stuck on an endless series of "Buffer I/O Error on device hdc, logical block xx"" (each line showed a different logical block number).

My XP installation runs fine.

What might the error mean?


I had the same problem using the free ubuntu disk you can order. I bought a new CD drive and all was ok. My drive must of been faulty.

mrainey

Slow burn speed did the trick for me.  A quick visit to the Ubuntu forum made it clear that the problem has been seen by others, and that it's not just with Ubuntu.  Variability in ISO burn quality and CD drives seem to be the prime suspects - which you and I more or less  confirm.
Software For Metalworking
http://closetolerancesoftware.com

Kale

I must admit that Ubuntu really does rock. I tried using mandrake linux years ago as a test and got on ok but had to give it up because i like my pc games to much. ;)

Ubuntu makes me go wow everytime i boot it up and have a play but i always have to come back to windoze because the support for (my) hardware and games just isn't there in ubuntu. It's really a shame for me as i really want to leave MS behind. ??? I'm hoping in the future real wireless network support is added (open source) by a big player and that ATI and NVidia start an open source driver project. Only then will gamers like me move and hopefully MS will lose market share. I look forward to this. :)

Doc

QuoteI'm hoping in the future real wireless network support is added (open source) by a big player...
The real problem here has little to do with Linux of any variety. It the hardware folks that are causing problems by not building drivers or at the very least, releasing the code to be ported by others.

Perhaps one day the Linux user-base will have the $clout$ required to get their attention.  :-\

If you are having trouble with the wireless, I might be able to help you out... The wireless on the laptop used for my current Ubuntu installation is rock solid (finally). I'll be glad to pass along some pointers and/or instructions. :)

-Doc-

Jerry Muelver

Doc, I got Ubuntu running on a 7-year-old Compaq box, and 10-year-old Dell Inspiron. I've got a Dell wireless card for the Inspiron. I'm thinking I should just drag the Dell to a wifi station and see what happens. Any hints?

Ionic Wind Support Team

Quote
Doc, I got Ubuntu running on a 7-year-old Compaq box, and 10-year-old Dell Inspiron. I've got a Dell wireless card for the Inspiron. I'm thinking I should just drag the Dell to a wifi station and see what happens. Any hints?

Bottom line is it depends on the chipset in the wireless card.  Realtek chips work well, I have had a few problems with Prism based wireless cards, but none that I couldn't solve.

The biggest problems under linux seem to be with the USB stick style wireless adapters.  I had a netgear MA111 that took me forever to get to work reliably, it was a USB device with a Prism 2 chipset. 

Ionic Wind Support Team

Brice Manuel

QuoteI had a netgear MA111 that took me forever to get to work reliably, it was a USB device with a Prism 2 chipset.
I haven't had good luck with any NETGEAR hardware under Linux.  I could never get my NETGEAR USB to Ethernet Adapter working on my internet system when Linux was installed.  Part of why I am still using XP to connect to the net.

Doc

Hey Jer,

Paul is correct... it always comes down to the chipset used. However! I've found that the NdisWrapper utility works for a pretty large variety of cards, assuming of course you can get you hands on the original Windows drivers.

If you do not have the drivers, here is a link to a wiki-page that can be helpful:
http://ndiswrapper.sourceforge.net/mediawiki/index.php/

Once you have the drivers available, install NdisWrapper using Synaptics and then let me know. I'll throw together a mini-tutorial explaining all the steps that seems to work with the current Ubuntu distro. 

For reasons I cannot explain, previous Ubuntu distro's (all Debian based distro's for that matter) have been impossible to get working on this end and I had just about given up on the idea.  I was so shocked when it worked so well, I actually wiped the partition and re-installed to make sure I wasn't dreaming.  ::)

-Doc-

Ionic Wind Support Team

A thank yoou goes out to Randall Brodka for being Linux Contributor #7. 
Ionic Wind Support Team

Brice Manuel

February 10, 2007, 07:06:18 PM #123 Last Edit: February 10, 2007, 07:29:16 PM by Brice Manuel
Paul, a few questions:

1.  Do you forsee any problems porting the existing 2D commands over to Linux?
2.  On Linux, for windowed games, when we size a window will it be sized by client size?
3.  Coding-wise is there anything we need to worry about, avoid or do to make sure our programs will make the transition to Linux as hassle-free as possible?



Ionic Wind Support Team

#1.  Won't know until I get into them.  Should really change the names of the commands, just feels weird using OpenGL on Linux with commands named DX...   Of course that is not an issue with Aurora.

#2.  In GTK, QT, etc,  the size you give a window is the client size, which is the opposite of the Windows way of doing it.  Which has to do with the way X works.  Window managers in Linux add decorations (caption, scrollbars, etc) to the windows after it is created, and there is no reliable way of specifying a "total" window size since the size of the decorations aren't know until after the window is created.  When you think about it the X way makes more sense.

#3. The only really big change so far is the message loop.  In Windows you have to roll your own and modify it to do special processing like accelerators, dialog message processing, etc.  Emergence for Windows has a custom message loop that exits after each queue full of messages is processed so you can check for external variables.  Hence the WAITUNTIL statement.

Using GTK+ there isn't an advantage to rolling your own loop as events are handled quite differently.  I am still making up my mind on how we want to handle that.  Currently I have two commands, WAIT and ENDWAIT, which start the event loop and end it.  WAIT 1 still functions as before.  So in Windows if you were doing:

...
WAITUNTIL run = 0
END

SELECT @MESSAGE
     CASE @IDCLOSEWINDOW
          CLOSEWINDOW win
           run = 0

In Linux it looks like this:

...
WAIT
END

SELECT @MESSAGE
      CASE @IDCLOSEWINDOW
           CLOSEWINDOW win
               ENDWAIT:' exits the event loop started by WAIT.
...

The reason for this is it is perfectly valid to have more than one WAIT command in Linux.  ENDWAIT exits the innermost encountered one.

As for other things to watch for...well there isn't a Windows API on Linux, obviously, so if you are using a lot of imports from the Windows DLLs you'll need to find other ways to do it.  As an oddity you can actually link with the wine libraries and the imports will resolve, havent tried it yet though ;)

Paul.
Ionic Wind Support Team